The mobile lifestyle is not for everyone, though. It takes patience, hard work (often
without seeing any results in the beginning) and the strong desire and ability to
make a big change in your current lifestyle, even to turn your whole life around.
It’s for the adventure seekers, for those who don’t want to live a mundane lifestyle
in their comfort zone, who feel like there’s much more to life, want to expand their
horizons and challenge themselves.

Also, they want a taste of the ultimate freedom.
And what better way to do it than to be free of having a boss and fixed working
hours and to be able to do what you love from anywhere in the world?!
That’s how location independence works. You find your passion, work hard on
monetizing it, then either stay at home (if that’s what you want), or go travel the
world (permanently or just move to another place for a month or a few and then
come back).
You may be ready for that, to have taken the decision to become a lifestyle entre-
preneur and not to be dependent on location, but there are some important choic-
es you need to make before you start the journey.
1. Is The Mobile Lifestyle For You?
Give it a second thought.
Many people feel far too safe in their 9-to-5 job that they can hardly ever leave it.
And although that security is an illusion as you’re making someone else rich, don’t
have freedom and time, can get fired, and aren’t fulfilling your potential, you may
feel worse if you get out there and work for yourself.
So think about it. Are you ready to just leave and move to another place (even if it’s
for a short period)?
Most people decide to give this philosophy of living a try because they want an
adventure, to explore the world, to actually travel the world one time, or else.
If you’re like that, then you should definitely build a business that can be run from
anywhere and make money while on the road.
Here’s how Tim Ferriss describes this modern way of traveling in The 4-Hour
Workweek:
“If you are accustomed to working 50 weeks per year, the tendency, even after cre-
ating the mobility to take extended trips, will be to go nuts and see 10 countries in
14 days and end up a wreck. It's like taking a starving dog to an all you-can-eat buf-
fet. It will eat itself to death.
I did this three months into my 15-month vision quest, visiting seven countries and
going through at least 20 check-ins and checkouts with a friend who had nego-
tiated three weeks off. The trip was an adrenaline-packed blast but like watching life
on fast-forward. It was hard for us to remember what had happened in which coun-
tries (except Amsterdam65), we were both sick most of the time, and we were
upset to have to leave some places simply because our prepurchased flights made
it so.
I recommend doing the exact opposite.
2Type of Location Independent Lifestyle Would Be Perfect
For You?

There’s not just one option, you know!
In fact, most people don’t even realize that some version of the mobile lifestyle
may make them happy simply because they haven’t thought of it.
In this post Dan Andrews from TropicalMBA shares the most popular concepts for
running a business from anywhere.
Here are some of them:


“Working both first 1 thing in the morning , and 2 for another few
hours in the early evening.
Four and done. If you are just getting started, you may want to push yourself to find
your 5 hours, but if you want to continue to grow and operate a successful busi-
ness, I think 4hours of creative work a day is a realistic target.
30 day challenges or longer term life quests.
Mini-retirement. Bail out on your life for 3 to 6 months in order to go somewhere
new, ideally to engage in a project that is uniquely interesting to you.
Moving to a cheap foreign location and flaneuring around. I’ve met many people for
whom a lifestyle of constant wandering works. I always considered it to be an en-
trepreneurial insurance plan for me.
I figured, I would prefer to be living “1000 and a backpack” to “8 to 4,” and relatively speaking, wondering around the world on 1 to 2000 a month in earnings is a
less stressfuly way of living than 8to 4.
Slow travel. 3 months in a lplace, slowly moving from location to location and setting
up shop.
Digital nomad hub. A place you can land and within 24 hours be hooked up with a
service apartment, a location to work, and some like-minded entrepreneurs to hang
out with (all without paying through the nose).
a collection of place and relationships that together form a home base.
an invest in a home or home space, but with long term stays elsewhere or
abroad.
Baseline. Find a place to live that reduces your expenses as low as possible to ex-
tend your cash runway and extend your free time.”        
Interesting, right? 
Personally, I’m quite interested in the slow travel and mini-retirements. In fact, I’ve already organized my first ‘vacation’ - I’ll be spending 5 weeks in Thailand this win- ter, where I’ll keep working from my laptop, but also get to know another culture, try new things, live like the locals, and wake up near an exotic beach.


The mobile lifestyle is not for everyone


The mobile lifestyle is not for everyone, though. It takes patience, hard work (often
without seeing any results in the beginning) and the strong desire and ability to
make a big change in your current lifestyle, even to turn your whole life around.
It’s for the adventure seekers, for those who don’t want to live a mundane lifestyle
in their comfort zone, who feel like there’s much more to life, want to expand their
horizons and challenge themselves.

Also, they want a taste of the ultimate freedom.
And what better way to do it than to be free of having a boss and fixed working
hours and to be able to do what you love from anywhere in the world?!
That’s how location independence works. You find your passion, work hard on
monetizing it, then either stay at home (if that’s what you want), or go travel the
world (permanently or just move to another place for a month or a few and then
come back).
You may be ready for that, to have taken the decision to become a lifestyle entre-
preneur and not to be dependent on location, but there are some important choic-
es you need to make before you start the journey.
1. Is The Mobile Lifestyle For You?
Give it a second thought.
Many people feel far too safe in their 9-to-5 job that they can hardly ever leave it.
And although that security is an illusion as you’re making someone else rich, don’t
have freedom and time, can get fired, and aren’t fulfilling your potential, you may
feel worse if you get out there and work for yourself.
So think about it. Are you ready to just leave and move to another place (even if it’s
for a short period)?
Most people decide to give this philosophy of living a try because they want an
adventure, to explore the world, to actually travel the world one time, or else.
If you’re like that, then you should definitely build a business that can be run from
anywhere and make money while on the road.
Here’s how Tim Ferriss describes this modern way of traveling in The 4-Hour
Workweek:
“If you are accustomed to working 50 weeks per year, the tendency, even after cre-
ating the mobility to take extended trips, will be to go nuts and see 10 countries in
14 days and end up a wreck. It's like taking a starving dog to an all you-can-eat buf-
fet. It will eat itself to death.
I did this three months into my 15-month vision quest, visiting seven countries and
going through at least 20 check-ins and checkouts with a friend who had nego-
tiated three weeks off. The trip was an adrenaline-packed blast but like watching life
on fast-forward. It was hard for us to remember what had happened in which coun-
tries (except Amsterdam65), we were both sick most of the time, and we were
upset to have to leave some places simply because our prepurchased flights made
it so.
I recommend doing the exact opposite.
2Type of Location Independent Lifestyle Would Be Perfect
For You?

There’s not just one option, you know!
In fact, most people don’t even realize that some version of the mobile lifestyle
may make them happy simply because they haven’t thought of it.
In this post Dan Andrews from TropicalMBA shares the most popular concepts for
running a business from anywhere.
Here are some of them:


“Working both first 1 thing in the morning , and 2 for another few
hours in the early evening.
Four and done. If you are just getting started, you may want to push yourself to find
your 5 hours, but if you want to continue to grow and operate a successful busi-
ness, I think 4hours of creative work a day is a realistic target.
30 day challenges or longer term life quests.
Mini-retirement. Bail out on your life for 3 to 6 months in order to go somewhere
new, ideally to engage in a project that is uniquely interesting to you.
Moving to a cheap foreign location and flaneuring around. I’ve met many people for
whom a lifestyle of constant wandering works. I always considered it to be an en-
trepreneurial insurance plan for me.
I figured, I would prefer to be living “1000 and a backpack” to “8 to 4,” and relatively speaking, wondering around the world on 1 to 2000 a month in earnings is a
less stressfuly way of living than 8to 4.
Slow travel. 3 months in a lplace, slowly moving from location to location and setting
up shop.
Digital nomad hub. A place you can land and within 24 hours be hooked up with a
service apartment, a location to work, and some like-minded entrepreneurs to hang
out with (all without paying through the nose).
a collection of place and relationships that together form a home base.
an invest in a home or home space, but with long term stays elsewhere or
abroad.
Baseline. Find a place to live that reduces your expenses as low as possible to ex-
tend your cash runway and extend your free time.”        
Interesting, right? 
Personally, I’m quite interested in the slow travel and mini-retirements. In fact, I’ve already organized my first ‘vacation’ - I’ll be spending 5 weeks in Thailand this win- ter, where I’ll keep working from my laptop, but also get to know another culture, try new things, live like the locals, and wake up near an exotic beach.